RSS

The NAACP has a message…

11 Aug

womanwriterblog

 

The NAACP has a message for a mostly white Alabama town that got the green light from a federal judge to split from a racially mixed county school district and start its own system.  In the end, however, Haikala allowed the split to be fair to the parents in Gardendale “who support a municipal separation for reasons that have nothing to do with race.”  However, Haikala also reserved the right to reverse her decision if Gardendale reverted back. Corky Siemaszko – NBC NEWS

The subject of this news clip is a small town that is home to some of what I call “shirttail” relatives’, however, I am certain they are relatives from the “white” side of the family.  Gardendale, Alabama a suburb of Birmingham was always white; it is located in Jefferson County and there has always been racial discord there.  Since desegregation became a reality to die hard Bible belt white folk, Gardendale has wanted to create its own school system and town leaders, it appears that these white folk are concerned that their town may become mostly black, while they prefer it to be mostly white.

I suppose that I am back on Trump again, nonetheless, I am fearful that these types of shameful situations will be on the rise as segregation, outlawing Islam, destroying US agriculture by deporting most of its field workers is the plan wanted by many of his followers.  Trump has been endorsed by major racists in the US, many White Supremacist hate groups openly campaigned for him.

AGAIN, I AM ORIGNALLY FROM ALABAMA!

I remember some of the wording (so I had to look it up) of the ORDINANCE OR GENERAL CODE created by the City of Birmingham, Alabama.  It stated that it would be unlawful for a Negro and a white person to play together, or be in the company with each other in any game of cards, dice, dominoes, checkers, baseball, softball, football, basketball or similar games.  Now, this ordinance was created from some of Alabama’s finest!

I have seen what happens up close and personally, what hate will do.  I personally witnessed what hate can do, and I will tell you now that even as a student in school if you were not a part of the “Jim Crow” laws or believed in them, you were called traitor or worse .  I lived through the demonstration eras of the 1950s and 1960s; it was horrible to hear of innocent people being treated as horrible as they were and the rules were made up as each incident occurred, not lawful rules; rules of hate.   There were still struggles to follow but the Civil Rights Act of 1964-banned segregation in public accommodations and employment in Alabama.  This may have ban segregation in the physically, but not the mentally.  There were no laws on how southerners thought and felt about what they were being “made” to do.

th8XBR6XUJ

Which brings me to the rise of African Americans as they were called in those days of essential freedoms, and that the Native Americans were not even considered American citizens at the time; the 14th Amendment that gave Blacks their citizenship excluded Native Americans.   Native Americans were not granted U.S. citizenship and the right to vote 1924 was 54 years after African-American men were allowed to vote, and four years after women received the same right with the 19th Amendment.

thFD03JQ7D

My father, who was of Native American Chickasaw heritage, did not have the right to vote until he was twenty-one-years old.  His grandmother who was of the Mississippi Old Towne Tribe raised him, she eventually moved to Tarrant City, Alabama where she became a woman of means for the times.  My father came to live with her when he was just a boy after his mother died because he was going to be sent to the Indian School where they Americanized children.   The idea was that when indigenous people learned United States (American) customs and values, they would be able to merge tribal traditions with American culture and peacefully join society.  She removed him from the danger of this Americanization and placed him (for the right amount of money) into the local Catholic School.

I went through school hearing “kids” say that my father was a dirty Indian; that was the country school I attended, when we moved into town not so much (maybe the city kids were less “Redneck”).  Rarely did my mother go anywhere with my father, I believe she was embarrassed because she was a very prejudice person, why did she marry him, that’s another story.  When he moved his grandmother in with us, along with a grand old black lady that I called Aunt Francis (a common name for the times) that help raise me; I rarely saw her myself.  It was my father, great-grandmother, and Aunt Francis who taught me the values I possess today; I am so very grateful to them.

Therefore, as you can see I have lived in both worlds where prejudice lived and it was not present, when I read that towns like Gardendale, Alabama can now return to segregation I am embarrassed all over again.   Alabama is a beautiful state and I am certain that there are wonderful people who live there, but beauty as it is said to be only…skin-deep.

As a country that has always been GREAT…we cannot go backwards, we have lost too much in gaining what we have to let these crucial laws be changed.  We all need to join the fight against segregation laws being overturned.  Elizabeth Ann Johnson-Murphree

 

Tags:

5 responses to “The NAACP has a message…

  1. House of Heart

    August 11, 2017 at 12:16 pm

    A wonderful text. I too am from the Deep South and see what racism and prejudice can do.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  2. Elouise

    August 11, 2017 at 7:27 pm

    We moved to Savannah, Georgia when I was 7 1/2 — from El Monte, California. It’s a different world. You have to live in it, cheek and jowl (as they say) beside each other daily to see and feel utter disgust at the tragedy wreaked on this nation by segregation–which, in my mind, includes segregation of American Indians, including segregation from their rightful land and nations. The longer I live (now 73), the more I see us racing backwards, head over heels, to get and keep this land as ‘my’ land rather than ‘our’ land. God help us all.

    Your pen and your stories are mighty, Ann. Thanks for sharing them.
    Elouise

    Liked by 1 person

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: